Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Review: Vinyl Reissue of The Flying Burrito Brothers' 'Gilded Palace of Sin'


Gram Parsons’s stint in The Byrds was very brief but it really shook things up. His Country & Western influence was so profound on Sweetheart of the Rodeo that The Byrds’ seemed unsure how to continue without him, unable to fully commit to country rock without his guiding hand but unable to completely go back to their jangly roots either, and the band never released another great album. More positively, country rock was officially born, and once Chris Hillman resolved to bail on The Byrds too, so were The Flying Burrito Brothers.

This was the band The Byrds probably would have been had Parsons not had the moral fortitude to quit when they decided to tour Apartheid-torn South Africa. Pure country is more present on the band’s debut The Gilded Palace of Sin then it had even been on Sweetheart of the Rodeo, partially because Roger McGuinn often sounded like he wasn’t taking the material entirely sincerely, doing a Deputy Dawg drawl on things like “The Christian Life”. As Burrito Brothers, Parsons and Hillman harmonize with heartbreaking sincerity and have the serious material to match, the finest song being the ridiculously named but utterly heartfelt cry of betrayal “Hot Burrito #1”. There is also none of the harder boogying of Sweetheart of the Rodeo on The Gilded Palace of Sin, though Sneaky Pete’s creative use of lap steel guitar that pierces fuzz tones through tracks such as “Wheels” and “Hot Burrito #2” and a pair of soul covers certainly make Gilded Palace something other than a typical country disc. The ideology of songs such as the draft-dodging “My Uncle” and “Hippie Boy”, which tricks listeners into assuming it will be a goofy parody (much like the Stones’ “Far Away Eyes”, which it clearly influenced) but sucker punches us with tragedy and empathy, also helps distinguish this new approach to country from its conservative predecessor.

The Gilded Palace of Sin is essentially raw, rustic music that demands an organic presentation to convey its woody textures. Intervention Records’ new all-analog vinyl reissue does just that. Bass tones are incredibly deep yet clear. The acoustic guitars and upper-register harmonies never get lost in murk. The range of this mastering is beautiful, much like the music itself.
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