Thursday, March 22, 2012

Bowie's 'Ziggy Stardust' to Be Reissued This June

One June 5, EMI will be launching a 40th Anniversary edition of David Bowie’s, The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Bowie’s futuristic masterpiece will appear in standard CD, DVD audio with 5.1 surround mixes, and 180-gram vinyl editions. Ray Staff, the cat who mastered the original album back in 1972, has remastered it for this new release.

The CD and vinyl editions are pretty bare bones, featuring only the eleven tracks from the original album. The DVD audio edition includes both stereo and 5.1 mixes of that album, as well as 5.1 mixes of the following bonus tracks: “Moonage Daydream (instrumental)”, “The Supermen”, “Velvet Goldmine”, and “Sweet Head”.

Many thanks to the Second Disc for this scoop.

Here’s what I had to say about The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars in Psychobabble's Eleven Greatest Albums of 1972:

David Bowie really became David Bowie with 1971’s Hunky Dory, sustaining his signature eclecticism across an entire L.P. for the first time and mapping out his shape-shifting modus operandi with the anthem “Changes”. By his next album, he was already done with being David Bowie. The singer assumes his first iconic persona: the decadent, suicidal alien Rock star Ziggy Stardust. Like all great rock operas or concept albums or whatever The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars is, greatness lies not in some vaguely sketched plot but in the wonderful songs that relate it. Bowie’s ruminations on extraterrestrials and celebrity drama don’t stick as securely as the superb songs and performances that house them. He gets the right backing with the Spiders from Mars, a mighty and unique band led by sci-fi guitarist extraordinaire Mick Ronson. Bowie’s rockers are amazingly sharp, whether thundering (“Moonage Daydream”), boogying (“Suffragette City”), slashing (“Ziggy Stardust”), or sliding on a slick of sleaze (“Hang on to Yourself”). His ballads are dramatic without flitting toward the show-tuney lightness of his earlier records. In their own ways, “Five Years”, “Lady Stardust”, and “Rock and Roll Suicide” are just as forceful as the up-tempo numbers. The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars solidified Bowie’s cred by supplying an ace reservoir material for the concerts that proved his florid dramatic ambitions could meld with throat-throttling Rock & Roll seamlessly. Bowie had a lot more spectacular albums up his unitard’s single sleeve, but his greatest is The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars.
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